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Preparing for Care
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For HR Professionals - Here Is The Issue

For HR Professionals, the upcoming epidemic to be faced is a silent one. Baby boomer workers coming into the boss's office saying "I need to take some time off - something has happened to Mom/Dad" is much more common than ever before.  Because so many workers and workplaces are lacking materials, resources or proper pre-planning and education - the bosses are left at a loss, as are the companies on what to do to help, or how to replace this worker's productivity.  The statistics are alarming, to say the least...

  • Americans are living longer and the number of older adults is steadily increasing with 20% of Americans reaching or exceeding the age of 65 by 2030 (U.S. Census Bureau 2007). These facts suggest that the adult children of these elders will be spending a significant amount of time care giving for their parents or other relatives, often along with raising their own children.
  • The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) Workplace Forecast of 2004-2005 indicated that the two most important demographic trends impacting the workplace are the growth in the number of workers with eldercare responsibilities and the growth in the number of workers with both childcare and eldercare responsibilities.
  • According to SHRM, over 90% of companies surveyed expect an increase in the number of employees  caring for elderly relatives two most important demographic trends impacting the workplace are the growth in the number of workers with eldercare responsibilities and the growth in the number of workers with both childcare and eldercare responsibilities.
  • MetLife Mature Market Place Institute reports between 15 and 25% of the workforce now care for elders and by 2010, the percent is expected to double. These family caregivers struggle to balance their own work and elder care obligations. This juggling act often affects a workers health, finances, and family and social life-and results in lost productivity at work.

    Employed caregivers take a toll on productivity by:
    • Coming in late or leaving early (57%)
    • Taking a leave of absence (17%)
    • Shifting from full time to part time (10%)
    • Turning down promotion (4%)
    • Giving up work entirely (6%)
    • Choosing to retire early (3%)
  • Caregivers who live farther away are more likely to rearrange their work schedules (44%) and miss work days (36%).
Here Is Your Solution
Contact Preparing For Care -  We can help you develop the solutions you need for your business.
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